Isaac Brock taught Big Boi how to make a bong out of an apple

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Big Boi at City Arts Fest in 2010. Photo by Suzi Pratt

Big Boi at City Arts Fest in 2010. Photo by Suzi Pratt

 

It’s pretty well-known that Big Boi is producing some tracks for Modest Mouse‘s upcoming album. The record, which has yet to be given a release date, is a highly anticipated release and last year the folks at Pitchfork spoke with Big Boi and asked him about the progress of the album.

Big Boi didn’t say anything too revealing about the record, but he did talk about smoking weed with Isaac Brock and the Modest Mouse frontman actually taught Big Boi one of the oldest weed-smoking tricks in the book. He taught Sir Luscious Leftfoot how to make a pipe out of an apple.

I’m not sure why, but I find the image of Isaac Brock showing Big Boi how to smoke pot out of an apple to be quite humorous. First, the thought of both of them in the same room making music together sort of makes me giggle a little bit, but how did they even stumble onto the topic of smoking weed out of an apple? Why didn’t they have a pipe, or rolling papers? What made them resort to using the fruit spread in the studio? So may questions.

Anyway, here’s the full interview with Big Boi and the apple-bong comment is below.

Pitchfork: What’s happening with the stuff you did with Modest Mouse?

BB: It’s for their record; it’s coming. We actually took a trip back out there to go see them a couple months ago. I did maybe three records with them. Isaac [Brock] is cool, man, like cowboy cool. He showed me how to make a bong out of an apple and shit. For real.

 

Travis Hay

About Travis Hay

Travis Hay is a professional music journalist who has spent the past 13 years documenting and enjoying Seattle's diverse music scene. In 2009 he established Guerrilla Candy and is currently the site's editor and publisher. He has written for various media outlets including MSN Music, the Seattle-Post Intelligencer, Seattle Weekly, Crosscut.com and others and was the founder and former editor of the defunct music site Ear Candy.